The Key Peninsula is rich in historical interest.

When first mapped by Peter Puget, the area was populated with various Indian tribes who fished clamed and hunted the bounty of the Key Peninsula.
The first settler to the Key Peninsula was W.D. Vaughn, who arrived in 1851. Shortly thereafter he filed a homestead claim and founded the town of Vaughn. Lakebay was named such by the Creviston family in 1871. Logging, sawmills and farming were the principal industries of the area. As there were no roads, early Key Peninsula residents traveled via "the Mosquito Fleet", numerous privately-run ferries.
Though times have changed, you can still experience the Key Peninsula's colorful charm and natural beauty from the comfort of your car. Visit the Key Peninsula Historical Society Museum in Vaughn to pick up your auto-tour guide.
Follow the history of the Key Peninsula by visiting the links below.
Key Center, the heart of the peninsula with shopping, dinning, and old time charm.

Home, founded as a utopian community in 1896 still has some of the original freethinking settler families and many of the original properties. More...

Longbranch envisioned as a East Coast type seaside resort. More...

Lakebay Lakebay and Bay Lake named for their close proximity to each other. More...

Glen Cove, originally called Balch Cove after early resident Billy Balch and Captain Lafayette Balch founder of Steilacoom. More...

Minter, earliest history in the area and known for its oyster farm. More...

Heron Island, 1.25 miles long, and 1/2 mile across - off the west side of the Key Peninsula and accessible by boat including a private ferry.

Vaughn William Vaughn made the first land claim on the Key Peninsula on the south side of the bay that now bears his name. The Key Peninsula Museum can be found here. More...

Spend the night, weekend, vacation, or a lifetime on the Key Peninsula.